What Sweden can teach us about brand connections

By Suzanne Buzek
April 9th, 2016

You may be hard-pressed to talk to a live person when you call your cable company, but if you have the urge to talk to a Swede, a random (live!) one will pick up after a couple rings.

Yes, this is a thing, and it’s beautiful.

Sweden is following the trend (set by Iceland and Ireland) to bring a more human element to what may be considered a cold, stoical region of the world – in both temperature and temperament.

Brands are presented with countless opportunities to do the same, and smart ones have mobilized their employees and loyal customers to do so. Customer service teams are more responsive than ever on social media. Employees double as brand advocates (for example, search #lifeatkohls). Many companies are investing in more, and better, technology to take friction out of having a question answered or purchasing a product.

And sometimes, a simple phone number and a live person on the other end to answer is the human connection that’s needed to keep a brand real, genuine and fun.

What are some of the ways you can humanize your brand for better engagement and sparking new connections?

 

By | 2017-03-12T18:46:58+00:00 April 9th, 2016|Corporate Communications, Marketing Communications, Uncategorized, Vr3|Comments Off on What Sweden can teach us about brand connections

About the Author:

Suzanne doesn’t know what it’s like to be bored, and does everything possible to keep it that way. She thrives on being able to huddle with a team and move quickly in the face of business realities while taking the time to brainstorm the Next Big Idea with a client.

Prior to joining Vehr, Suzanne helped manage communications to support 1,000 national customers at Cintas. She developed toolkits to educate 30,000 employees; created sales presentations, branding campaigns, collateral materials and more; and managed the company’s agency partner relationships.

Suzanne moonlights as VP of Marketing Communications for American Marketing Association Cincinnati. She lives in Northern Kentucky with no plans to give up her 513 area code (she is from Westwood, after all). You can find her enjoying the local music scene and trying to keep up with two book clubs—luckily one of them is more focused on sampling rosé than on actually finishing what they read.