I realized that when I write blog posts, I write in the tone of the subject. For my last blog post about Wendy’s (which you can read here) I used a lot of terms that Wendy’s or their customers who follow them on Twitter would use. That doesn’t necessarily mean that everyone else will understand, so here is a list of common millennial/Gen Z terms and their meanings.

P.S. This can also come in handy if you are trying to reach a younger audience.

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Savage: When someone (or some company) is brutally honest and doesn’t care if they offend anyone.
How it’s used in a sentence: Wendy’s tweets are savage.

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Extra: When someone is being over the top or very exaggerated.
How it’s used in a sentence: She is so extra, she always goes way too far.

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Lit: Describes when something is happening or going well. Not a commentary on the lighting in a room.
How it’s used in a sentence: This party is totally lit!

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On Fleek: Looking good, or perfect.
How it’s used in a sentence: Those eyebrows are on fleek.

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Bae: Girlfriend/Boyfriend. Before All Else.
How it’s used in a sentence: I love my bae.

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Snack: Attractive person.
How it’s used in a sentence: Justin Timberlake is a snack.

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Shoot my shot: Go for it.
How it’s used in a sentence: I saw her and knew I had to shoot my shot, so I asked her out.

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Ghost: When you stop talking to someone after a date. Not a Halloween costume.
How it’s used in a sentence: He totally ghosted me after our first date.

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Curve: Ignore someone interested in you.
How it’s used in a sentence: Rhianna curved Drake at the awards show last night.

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Sliding into the DMs: When someone writes a direct message on Twitter or Instagram.
How it’s used in a sentence: We met because she slid into my DMs.

Feeling enlightened? Glad we could help. For more on how to speak to your target audience, don’t miss our latest publication.